8000+ Peaks

  • K-2
  • Broad Peak
  • GASHABRUM I

K2 is the second-highest mountain on Earth. It is located in the Karakorum segment of the Himalayan range, on the border between the Gilgit- Baltistan region of the Pakistan administered Northern Areas and the Taxkorgan Tajik Autonomous County of Xinjiang, China. However, those who climb K2 must acquire entry via Pakistan as the Chinese side is inaccessible.

Trip Name
Ranked
Elevation
Other Names
Ideal Time
Durations
BaseCamp Height
First Ascent
Best Period
K-2
2ndnd in the World(1st) Pakistan
8611-m (28,251 ft)
Chogori and Mount Goldwin Austen
15June-25,Aug
60 Days
5135-m
July 31, 1954 Achille Compagnoni Lino Lacedell
June – August

Broad Peak (K3), is the 12th highest mountain on Earth. The name of Broad Peak introduced by W.M.Convey a British explorer during his expedition in 1892. In Balti language name of Broad Peak is (Phalchan Gangri ),because of its breadth at the top. It’s part of the Gasherbrum massif in Baltistan on the border of Pakistan and China. The route starts climbing through a rock gully to Camp I (6000m) then by passing a large snow face we reach Camp-II at around 6500m.

Trip Name

Ranked

Elevation

Location

Ideal Time

Durations

BaseCamp Height

First Ascent

Broad Peak/ FalchAn Gangri

12th and 4thin Pakistan

8047-M (26,414 ft)

Karakoram-Baltoro Skardu

15 June – 08 August

50 Days

4880-M

July 1954

Gasherbrum I (also known as Hidden Peak or K5) is the 11th highest peak on Earth, located on the border of China-Pakistan. Gasherbrum-I is part of the Gasherbrum massif, located in the Karakorum region of the Himalaya. Gasherbrum is often claimed to mean “Shining Wall”, presumably a reference to the highly visible face of the neighboring peak Gasherbrum IV; but in fact it comes from “rgasha” (beautiful) + “brum” (mountain) in Balti, hence it actually means “beautiful mountain.” Gasherbrum-I was designated K5 (meaning the 5th peak of the Karakorum) by T.G. Montgomery in 1856 when he first spotted the peaks of the Karakorum from more than 200 km away during the Great Trigonometric Survey of India. In 1892, William Martin Conway provided the alternate name, Hidden Peak, in reference to its extreme remoteness. Gasherbrum-I was first climbed on July 5, 1958 by Pete Schoening and Andy Kauffman of an eight-man American expedition led by Nicholas B. Clinch. Richard K. Irvin, Tom Nevison, Tom McCormack, Bob Swift and Gil Roberts were also members of the team.

  • Gashabrum II
  • Nanga Parbat(8,126 m )

K6 is the highest peak in the area surrounding in Chara Kusa or Saraksa and Nangma valley region which has seen renewed climbing interest in the years. While in Charkusa valley and Nangma valley are offered for marvelous rock climbing with easy access. This valley lies at the head of the Hushe Valley which in turn leads to the Shyok River and thence to the Indus River. The Charkusa gives access to the north side of K6,Lies in Nangma valley ,also is heaven of trekking and rock climbing ,however This valley is located in Kanda y is the second last village of the area.

Trip Name
Range
Elevation
Location
Ideal Time
Durations
BaseCamp Height
First Ascent
Camp Required
K6 /Baltistan Peak
Karakoram
7282-M (26,23891ft)
27th of the world
Karakoram-Hushe
15 June – 25 August
34 Days
4000-M
1970
 

 

A Challenge For Challengers” 8125m high Nanga Parbat, the Naked Mountain is the anchor peak of the Great Himalayas is the second highest peak in Pakistan. It has a bad connotation of the ‘Killer Mountain’ prompted the name because after Everest and Annapurna, this peak has claimed the lives of climbers. Nanga Parbat is counted the most difficult among the fourteen peaks on earth that exceed 8000 meters. The first ascent was done by Hermann Buhl of an Austro-German expedition in 1953 just after few weeks of Everest climbed by Sir Edmund Hillary.

Trip Name
Ranked
Elevation
Location
Ideal Time
Durations
BaseCamp Height
First Ascent
Nanga Parbat/ Diamir
9th of the world & 2ndin Pakistan
8,126 m (26,660 ft)
Western End of Himalaya
20 May – 10August
50 days
3550-M
July 3, 1953